Electroacupuncture releases stem cells to relieve pain, promote tissue repair, study finds

A study led by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers demonstrates how electroacupuncture triggers a neurological mechanism that can help promote tissue repair and relieve injury-induced pain.

Their findings, published online March 16 in the journal Stem Cells, provide the most comprehensive picture yet of how electroacupuncture stimulates the brain to facilitate the release of and adds new insight relating to the cells’ healing properties.

Electroacupuncture is a form of acupuncture that uses a small electrical current to augment the ancient Chinese medical practice of inserting fine needles into the skin at pre-determined points throughout the body.

For the study, a team of more than 40 scientists at institutions in the United States and South Korea was led by four senior authors including IU School of Medicine’s Maria B. Grant, MD, Marilyn Glick Professor of Ophthalmology and co-corresponding author; Mervin C. Yoder, MD, IU Distinguished Professor, Richard and Pauline Klingler Professor of Pediatrics, associate dean for entrepreneurial research at IU School of Medicine, director of the Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research and co-corresponding author; and Fletcher A. White, PhD, Vergil K. Stoelting Chair of Anesthesia, professor of anesthesia, pharmacology and toxicology.

“This work is a classic example of the power of team science, where investigators in different institutions with specific expertise worked together to unravel the complexity of how electroacupuncture works to help the body respond to stressors,” said Dr. Yoder.

The researchers performed a series of lab tests involving humans, horses and rodents that follow the effects of electroacupuncture from the stimulus of the needle all the way to the brain, resulting in the release of reparative (MSCs) into the bloodstream.

Depending on the species, electroacupuncture led to activation of the hypothalamus—a part of the brain that controls the nervous system and involuntary bodily functions such as heart rate and digestion—within nine to 22 minutes. The stem cells were mobilized within two hours.

“The acupuncture stimulus we’re giving these animals has a rapid effect on neuroanatomical pathways that connect the stimulus point in the arm to responsive neurons in the spinal cord and into a region in the brain called the hypothalamus. In turn, the hypothalamus directs outgoing signals to stem cell niches resulting in their release,” said Dr. White, who is a neuroscientist at the Richard L. Roudebush VA Medical Center in Indianapolis.

The researchers found electroacupuncture treatments resulted in higher thresholds for injury-induced pain, as well as considerable increases in the presence of a type of collagen that promotes tendon repair and anti-inflammatory cells known to be predictors of faster healing time.

Dr. White said these findings could lead to new strategies for and pain management related to injuries.

“We could potentially capture the MSCs from an individual’s blood following electroacupuncture and save the cells for future re-introduction in the patient post-surgery or to treat chronic pain due to an injury,” he said.

The horses used in the study had been injured during training for international dressage competitions, and the six people who took part were healthy volunteers, who still showed activation of their hypothalamus through brain imaging.

More information: Tatiana E. Salazar et al, Electroacupuncture Promotes CNS-Dependent Release of Mesenchymal Stem Cells, STEM CELLS (2017). DOI: 10.1002/stem.2613

Provided by: Indiana University

Acupuncture Can Ease Carpal Tunnel

Acupuncture can relieve wrist pain, and researchers have tracked the brain and nervous system changes that may help explain why.

Scientists randomized 80 people with mild or moderate carpal tunnel syndrome — pain caused by nerve compression at the wrist — to one of three groups. The first received acupuncture at the wrist and ankle. The second got acupuncture at the wrist alone. And the third received sham acupuncture, using “fake” needles near the affected wrist, as a placebo. Using functional M.R.I. and nerve conduction tests before and after the procedures, they measured the effect on brain and nerves.

Carpal-Tunnel-AcupunctureAll three groups found relief from pain, but both of the true acupuncture groups showed measurable physiological improvements in pain centers in the brain and nerves, while sham acupuncture did not produce such changes. Improvement in brain measures predicted greater pain relief three months after the tests, a long-term effect that placebo did not provide. The study is in Brain.

“What’s really interesting here is that we’re evaluating acupuncture using objective outcomes,” said the senior author, Vitaly Napadow, a researcher at Harvard. Sham acupuncture was good at relieving pain temporarily, he said, but true acupuncture had objective physiological — and enduring — effects.

“Acupuncture is a safe, low-risk, low side-effect intervention,” he continued. “It’s perfect for a first-line approach, and it’s something patients should consider before trying more invasive procedures like surgery.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/02/well/live/acupuncture-can-ease-wrist-pain-of-carpal-tunnel-syndrome.html?_r=3

Acupuncture May Help Prevent Migraines

24f035c2-ae9b-483e-9eb8-b99229ac0e61For people with a certain type of migraine headache, regular acupuncture treatments may help reduce the frequency of these debilitating attacks, a recent study from China suggests.

Patients who suffered migraines without aura, and who received five true acupuncture treatments per week for four consecutive weeks had about one less headache per month than similar patients who got the same number of sham acupuncture treatments, researchers report.

“Acupuncture should be considered as one option for migraine prophylaxis in light of our findings,” the authors write in JAMA Internal Medicine.

About 18 percent of women and 6 percent of men in the U.S. suffer from migraine headaches in a given year, according to a 2001 study, making the condition a leading cause of disability.

Acupuncture is commonly used to treat migraines in China, however, studies of whether it works for migraine prevention have been inconsistent, the study team notes.

Ling Zhao of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Sichuan, China, and colleagues recruited 249 adults who had an average of two to eight migraines without aura per month from three clinical centers in China.

For the study, participants kept track of their migraine headache frequency and severity for four weeks before being randomly assigned to receive true acupuncture treatment, sham acupuncture treatment or to be put on a waiting list for treatment.

People in both the true and sham acupuncture groups received 20 treatments with acupuncture needles and electrical stimulation, each lasting thirty minutes.

The true acupuncture group was treated at four acupuncture points thought to affect headaches and with enough electrical stimulation to elicit a “Deqi” sensation, which includes “soreness, numbness, distention or radiation that indicated effective needling,” according to the authors.

For the sham treatment, the needles were placed in areas not known to be acupuncture points and the deqi sensation wasn’t induced.

At 16 weeks, the number of migraines reported in the true acupuncture group fell by about three attacks per month, while people in the sham acupuncture group had two fewer attacks per month.

Among the study’s limitations, about 20 percent of the participants had previous experience with acupuncture, and it’s not known how many may have been able to guess whether their treatments were real or sham.

“Placebo response is strong in migraine treatment studies, and it is possible that the Deqi sensation . . . that was elicited in the true acupuncture group could have led to a higher degree of placebo response because there was no attempt made to elicit the Deqi sensation in the sham acupuncture group,” Dr. Amy Gelfand writes in an accompanying editorial.

Gelfand, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco, told Reuters Health that the placebo effect is interesting and important, especially in migraine studies, but she thinks about it differently as a researcher and as a clinician.

“When I’m a researcher, placebo response is kind of a troublesome thing, because it makes it difficult to separate signal from noise,” she said. But when she’s thinking as a doctor about the patient in front of her, placebo response is welcome, Gelfand said.

“You know, what I really want is my patient to feel better, and to be improved and not be in pain. So, as long as something is safe, even if it’s working through a placebo mechanism, it may still be something that some patients might want to use,” she said.

When a patient is interested in a treatment that may have a strong placebo effect, Gelfand added, “There’s a real checklist in my head, with safety being the first thing; and if it seems like it’s safe then I think about things like cost, because often these things are not going to be covered by insurance, but to a certain extent that’s the patient’s decision; and I think about time, because these treatments can be time-consuming.”

It’s a good idea to keep your doctor informed of any treatments that you’re using, be they over-the-counter supplements or non-pharmacologic behavioral treatments, she said.

“I think that that’s part of the picture, and as a provider, I like to know about all of those things. If for no other reason than it just helps me understand what kind of treatments my patient values and is looking for,” Gelfand said.

http://www.newsmax.com/t/health/article/775313?ns_mail_uid=58186744&ns_mail_job=1714212_02262017&s=al&dkt_nbr=ydnurkei%C2%A7ion&keywords=acupuncture-prevent-migraines&year=2017&month=02&date=23&id=775313&aliaspath=%2FHealth%2FArticle%2FArticleTemplate&oref=news.newsmax.com

Acupuncture Arts Hawaii Voted #1 Acupuncturist in Honolulu

Acupuncture Arts Hawaii Voted #1 Acupuncturist in HonoluluAcupuncture Arts Hawaii Voted #1 Acupuncturist in Honolulu Acupuncture Arts Hawaii Voted #1 Acupuncturist in HonoluluAcupuncture Arts Hawaii Voted #1 Acupuncturist in Honolulu Acupuncture Arts Hawaii is a Honolulu acupuncture, herb, and Chinese medicine clinic. Areas of expertise include Chinese and Japanese style acupuncture, fire cupping, tui-na, electro-stimulation, moxibustion, guasha, Qi Gong, and energy healing. The techniques are used to help treat addiction, arthritis, diabetes, infertility, allergies, depression, immune diseases, spinal problems, and more. Both doctors are Hawaii State-Licensed acupuncturists. Marc Capener, L.Ac. has an academic background in Ethno-Botany and Oriental Medicine, and has experience helping patients with PTSD, addiction, and insomnia. Leon Letoto, L.Ac. has nearly four decades of Qigong experience, is a Reiki master, and specializes in musculoskeletal disharmonies. Original Link to Article Posted Below: https://www.expertise.com/hi/honolulu/acupuncture#provider11

Acupuncture Arts Hawaii is a Honolulu acupuncture, herb, and Chinese medicine clinic. Areas of expertise include Chinese and Japanese style acupuncture, fire cupping, tui-na, electro-stimulation, moxibustion, guasha, Qi Gong, and energy healing. The techniques are used to help treat addiction, arthritis, diabetes, infertility, allergies, depression, immune diseases, spinal problems, and more.Marc Capener, L.Ac. is a Hawaii State-Licensed acupuncturist and has an academic background in Ethno-Botany and Oriental Medicine, and has experience helping patients with PTSD, addiction, and insomnia. Original Link to Article Posted Below:

https://www.expertise.com/hi/honolulu/acupuncture#provider11

 

Grand Opening!

Grand Opening Aloha Acupuncture Clinic Honolulu Hawaii

Come help us celebrate our official Grand Opening Celebration for our new non-profit 501c3 ‘Aloha Health Collective’. Which features Acupuncture Arts & Align DaKine with Dr. Kevin Cabriales. We will be having an all day meet and greet for the community and surrounding businesses to share our vision of making Holistic medicine accessible to everyone. Come check out our brand new Penthouse clinic, get free consultations. Free community style Acupuncture.

We will also be doing a raffle of gift certificates for free, and half off treatments & other healthful goodies. Drinks and pupus at 5. Pot luck style welcome. Lantern Floating ceremony/blessing at 7pm.

Friday September 30, 2016 – 5-8pm

Aloha Collective / Acupunctures Arts Hawaii

1136 Bishop St, 9th Floor, Penthouse 1B

Honolulu, Hawaii 96813

Fire Cupping Takes the Olympics by Storm

August Special: Chinese Fire Cupping Plus Consultation $40 for one treatment (regularly $69), 3 treatments for $100

Fire Cupping Hawaii Honolulu

If 19-time Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps does it for his health, then it’s gotta be good, right?

That’s what many are wondering after spotting cupping marks — those purplish circles — on the swimmer’s upper body poolside at the 2016 Olympics in Rio this week. Phelps also posted a shot of himself on Instagram being cupped last year.

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Phelps isn’t the only Olympic athlete sporting the circular purple markings. U.S. men’s gymnast Alex Naddour posted a recent selfie on Instagram showing a hint of cupping bruising. And some of his teammates have tried it, too.

It causes blood vessels to dilate and increases blood flow. The aim of cupping is to relieve any blockages in the flow of energy and blood and lead to better recovery. The suction pulls the tight muscles and stretches the fascia, the connective tissue around the muscles, and in effect, allows blood vessels to expand. The theory is that the increased blood flow speeds healing.

To try Chinese Fire Cupping, which has been around for thousands of years, call us today.

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New Research Acupuncture Can Ease Menopause Symptoms

A new study has found that acupuncture treatments can reduce the number of hot flashes and night sweats associated with menopause by as much as 36 percent.

“Although acupuncture does not work for every woman, our study showed that, on average, acupuncture effectively reduced the frequency of hot flashes and results were maintained for six months after the treatments stopped,” said Nancy Avis, Ph.D., a professor of public health sciences at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and lead author of the study.

Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the study included 209 women between the ages of 45 and 60 who had not had a menstrual period for at least three months. On average they had at least four hot flashes or night sweats a day in the previous two weeks.

Participants received a baseline assessment and were then randomly placed in one of two groups.

The first group received acupuncture treatments during the first six months. They were then followed without receiving acupuncture for the second six months.

The second group did not receive any acupuncture during the first six months, but did receive acupuncture for the second six months.

The women were allowed up to 20 treatments within six months provided by licensed, experienced acupuncturists in the community.

According to Avis, the study was designed to make it more “real world” by leaving the frequency and number of the acupuncture treatments up to the study participants and their acupuncturists.

All the women kept a daily diary on the frequency and severity of their hot flashes. They also answered questionnaires about other symptoms every two months.

After six months, the first group reported an average 36.7 percent decline in the frequency of hot flashes compared to baseline measurements. After a year, the benefits persisted, with the women maintaining an average 29.4 percent reduction from baseline.

The second group reported a six percent increase in symptom frequency during the six months when they were not getting acupuncture, but had similar results — an average 31 percent reduction in frequency — to the first group after receiving acupuncture during the second half of the trial, the researchers reported.

“There are a number of non-hormonal options for treating hot flashes and night sweats that are available to women,” Avis said. “None of these options seem to work for everyone, but our study showed that acupuncture from a licensed acupuncturist can help some women without any side effects. Our study also showed that the maximum benefit occurred after about eight treatments.”

Avis cautioned that the effect shown in the study could be due to non-specific effects, such as the additional care and attention the study participants received or the expectation of a benefit.

She also said that additional research is needed to identify individual differences in response to acupuncture.

The study was published in the journal Menopause.

Source: Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Diabetes & Acupuncture Combined with Chinese Herbal Medicine

Diabetes has become a common disease, as more than 1 million Americans will be diagnosed with Diabetes, this year alone. Diabetes is considered a long-term condition, however the symptoms are are manageable and greatly diminished by using alternative healing modalities like Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).

If you have Diabetes, this means that your body isn’t producing enough insulin, which is secreted by the pancreas. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the pancreas is considered to be part of the Spleen organ system, and the root cause of Diabetes is viewed as a correctable energetic disharmony.

Type I Diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks itself and the ability to produce insulin cells.  Type II Diabetes accounts for more than 90% of Diabetes in American, and it is often a disease caused by poor nutrition and a lack of regular exercise.  The theories behind treatment strategies can vary, both Type I and Type II Diabetes can be treated and managed effectively with acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine may be used to help reduce the dependency on insulin.  The best approach approach treating Diabetes often includes a team of health care providers, but if you or someone you know if suffering from Type I or Type II Diabetes be sure to consider Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in your treatment plan and recovery strategy.

Cancer Care and Management with Acupuncture and Chinese Herbal Medicine

Cancer is a diagnosis that may leave you feeling frightened and powerless, but it is important to have hope.  In many cases, cancer is a curable disease, especially when detected early.  Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) can not only reduce the side effects of standard Western medical therapies like radiation and chemotherapy, but they can also harmonize the body’s energy and tonify the immune system to help fight cancer.  Cancer is a blanket term for a group of diseases that occur when the body’s cells begin to reproduce abnormally and damage healthy tissues.

Acupuncture Traditional Chinese Medicine practitioners take a whole body (holistic) approach with health care.  In addition to acupuncture, you TCM practitioner may suggest Chinese herbs, nutrition advice, massage and/or vitamin supplements.  The goal is to treat the entire person, not just the disease.  Accordingly, the patient’s lifestyle, overall health and emotional state are considered when diagnosing and treating cancer in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine can help to relieve nausea and vomiting, post-surgical pain, and fatigue resulting from cancer treatments like surgery, radiation and chemotherapy.  It is important to take into consideration alternative healing treatments and health care options that can help you fight cancer and win.  Acupuncture is preventative, it is a good way to continue treatment even when you’ve beaten cancer.