Fire Cupping Takes the Olympics by Storm

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Fire Cupping Hawaii Honolulu

If 19-time Olympic gold medalist Michael Phelps does it for his health, then it’s gotta be good, right?

That’s what many are wondering after spotting cupping marks — those purplish circles — on the swimmer’s upper body poolside at the 2016 Olympics in Rio this week. Phelps also posted a shot of himself on Instagram being cupped last year.

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Phelps isn’t the only Olympic athlete sporting the circular purple markings. U.S. men’s gymnast Alex Naddour posted a recent selfie on Instagram showing a hint of cupping bruising. And some of his teammates have tried it, too.

It causes blood vessels to dilate and increases blood flow. The aim of cupping is to relieve any blockages in the flow of energy and blood and lead to better recovery. The suction pulls the tight muscles and stretches the fascia, the connective tissue around the muscles, and in effect, allows blood vessels to expand. The theory is that the increased blood flow speeds healing.

To try Chinese Fire Cupping, which has been around for thousands of years, call us today.

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